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Current category: Neuroscience and Psychoanalysis

Forgetting having denied: The “amnesic” consequences of denial.

Written on:December 22, 2017
Forgetting having denied: The “amnesic” consequences of denial.

Psychoanalysis and neurosciences: fuzzy outlines? Notes on the notion of cerebral plasticity.

Written on:December 14, 2017
Psychoanalysis and neurosciences: fuzzy outlines? Notes on the notion of cerebral plasticity.

Schizophrenia as a psychosomatic illness: An interdisciplinary approach between Lacanian psychoanalysis and the neurosciences.

Written on:November 11, 2017
Schizophrenia as a psychosomatic illness: An interdisciplinary approach between Lacanian psychoanalysis and the neurosciences.

Schizophrenia as a psychosomatic illness: An interdisciplinary approach between Lacanian psychoanalysis and the neurosciences.

Written on:November 11, 2017
Schizophrenia as a psychosomatic illness: An interdisciplinary approach between Lacanian psychoanalysis and the neurosciences.

Commentary on ‘The case for neuropsychoanalysis’.

Written on:October 28, 2017
Commentary on ‘The case for neuropsychoanalysis’.

On the argument for (and against) neuropsychoanalysis.

Written on:October 28, 2017
On the argument for (and against) neuropsychoanalysis.

Response to Kessler, Sandberg, and Busch: The case for and against neuropsychoanalysis.

Written on:October 28, 2017
Response to Kessler, Sandberg, and Busch: The case for and against neuropsychoanalysis.

Hierarchical Recursive Organization and the Free Energy Principle: From Biological Self-Organization to the Psychoanalytic Mind.

Written on:October 19, 2017
Hierarchical Recursive Organization and the Free Energy Principle: From Biological Self-Organization to the Psychoanalytic Mind.

The Evolutionary Psychology of Envy and Jealousy.

Written on:October 4, 2017
The Evolutionary Psychology of Envy and Jealousy.

Observations on Working Psychoanalytically with a Profoundly Amnesic Patient.

Written on:September 14, 2017
Observations on Working Psychoanalytically with a Profoundly Amnesic Patient.